Category Archives: skype in the classroom

Skypethon – without students!

Australia is not an easy country to connect due to our time zone. Australia, after New Zealand, is one of the first countries to greet a new date and day across the world.

There were a number of times, when I was able to connect with other classes of students. The first was with Masterwide 10, Kavali near Nellore in South India and it must have been 2am in the morning for them, 7:30am my time. After brief  introductions, we shared conversations, but they had technical issues so the connection was cut short.

Video call snapshot 370

Another visit to India was with Sebastian Panakal at St Mary’s public school, a 5 hour train journey from Kerala. It was interesting to speak with one of the head teachers, Ashik and another younger teacher and compare our education systems. It was fascinating to see one of the women deliver them their morning tea, whilst we spoke.

One of my network, created a Skyeathon group in Messenger. Many impromptu requests were made. One was from Dondi in Hungary where her students were eagerly waiting to share their folk songs with others. One was played on the flute and the other was sung to me.

Video call snapshot 427

Steve Auslander’s class were fascinated with the fact that I lived in their tomorrow. They had 10 minutes to connect before their school day finished and mine was about to start. One of his girls was really keen to come to Australia, so I sent a picture of a koala that had been in our driveway several days earlier.

 

Despite the dates for the Skypeathon having finished in Australia, the USA schools were still in November 29th, so  two calls were made to them  just before my school started and their school day finished.

One was a spontaneous request from Kyle Calderwood and his class who had 10 minutes before their next call. The second call was from Andrea Friend – a call that had been organised via Skype in the Classroom website. Both times I was able to share my screen with them and quickly show them some of our farm and wildlife.

Kyle Calderwood and his class.

Andrea Friend and her class

I love to travel and I love to learn. The Skypeathon provided both opportunities – one day I will try and work out how many miles we covered in total!!

Advertisements

Skypeathon – Day 2 Afternoon

This was a busy afternoon with contacts in India requesting connections. Unfortunately, Victoria is in Daylight Saving time which pushes us 5.5 hours ahead of India. Therefore there was only a 1.5 hour opportunity of synchronous class time. My senior classes have finished school, but as I had a ‘replacement’ year 9 class. They connected for the first 50 minutes with a couple of girls who had finished their work connecting for the last 40 minutes. Remarkably we were able to fit a number of connections in.

Anu Sharma and her students from New Delhi, India shared a little about India and then students from both sides interacted with questions.

Next, it was a connection with Masterwide from India. They treated us to colourful dances and shared a little of their culture.


The next connection was with a private senior school in New Delhi, India. Their teacher is Arti Chopra, a fellow master Skype teachers. Her students asked quite sophisticated questions of the two year 8 girls, including what policies our government has for looking after our older people, how technology is used in disaster management etc, but Angelina was able to respond and ask similar questions of them.

The final call for our school day was from Anamika Jha, also from India. Her students shared some talents, asked us questions, sang their national anthem and to our consternation, asked us to sing ours. We do not sing our national anthem as often as we should, students are rather shy of singing and when students do sing it, it is accompanied by a taped recording. However, the two girls, to their credit did sing.

These skype linkups all worked well. They were spontaneous on our part, organised on India’s part but students love to learn from each other. The #studentvoice can be powerful and connections like these help them to collaborate beyond classroom walls.

Day 2 Skypeathon: in the morning

Video call snapshot 378

Video call snapshot 376

This was a hectic day with many requests having come in from India. As we are in daylight saving, it pushed our times 5.5 hours apart. With only 1.5 of actual synchronous school time with India, it meant the connections were only 15 to 20 minutes in length which was not enough time. This post will describe the morning events.

Video call snapshot 374

First call was with Shiva, from India, who put together some amazing options for people to connect with his school – a cultural extravaganza,  a virtual field visit or mystery skype.  We chose the cultural extravaganza where we were treated to cultural dances, drumming and flute playing. The stage was set beautifully and once we got through the technical issues of not being able to hear the music, my students were treated to an extravaganza or Indian culture. Shiva had paid great attention to detail with colourful cards introducing the connection and a great online site and posters set up to promote it.

class watching

Next stop – Sri Lanka

IMG_0683

flag and class with aussie flag

This was a game of mystery skype with Roshan Kumar. Roshan’s student worked out our country well before we determine his. We eventually asked for clues as students immediately thought India (judging by appearances). One of the clues was that they live on an island, so Taiwan was mentioned but the second clue was that it was to the east of India.

Video call snapshot 382

There was a few minutes for sharing of cultural objects and information. My students were really interested in the description of their flag and the reason for the lion and all its features appear as it did. Roshan’s student asked “What is something unique about Australia” and we responded our animals ie koalas, kangaroos, emus, platypus etc. They responded that hospitality was one of their unique features.

Video call snapshot 380.png

tim with roshan

Next Up – a busy, busy afternoon

 

Day 1 Skypeathon 2017

Video call snapshot 368.png

Skype has been a tool that has helped transform teaching and learning in my classroom. It is free, user friendly, available world wide, suits the low bandwidth that I often have to deal with and is constantly being improved. There are many members in the Skype in Education community from across the world, all eager to connect and collaborate.

This is the third year of the 2 day Skypeathon and the dates are 28th and 29th November, with a theme of Open Hearts and Open Minds. Our school is nearing the end of the school year, so senior students have already finished which leaves me with only a few year 7 and 8 classes who can connect.

comparing times.jpg

Our first connection yesterday was with my year 7 ICT class with a school in Abakan, Republic of Khakassia in Russia. The teacher was Dina Averyanova. A coin was tossed over the webcam with tails called. We won the toss. Questions were asked with a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer to determine the location.

We asked whether they lived north of the equator and then whether they were in Asia. They responded yes to Asia and we responded no to them when asked. My students took a long time to work it out as they classify Russia as being in Europe. Finally we worked out the countries and then it was question time.

  1. Times of school days
  2. Comparing times and weather
  3. Number of students in the school
  4. Favourite sports
  5. What do you do after school?
    group shot

The learning was evident

  • Skype goal is written in miles. We had to convert to kms.
  • Temperature in Siberia was -17 degrees, we were 33 degrees celsius
  • School days start at 8am, finish at 1:30am in Russia, we start 9am and finish at 3:30pm
  • They had 700 students, we have 220
  • They classified them as being in Asia, which confused my students as they would have thought should be Europe
  • and so much more.

Research after the event: Is Russia really in Asia

Second connection: Our times for classes did not match with the linkup in India. So, several of my students sent a video message through skype with Neeral Mittal and her class in Ghazibad and are hoping that they will respond with a video message.

video message neeru mittal

 

 

 

 

Skypeathon 2017

IMG_0329

The two day annual Skypeathon Nov 28-29, is a great event encouraging all educators and classes to connect beyond their classrooms. Friendships can be formed that can lead onto ongoing projects and collaborative problem solving. The theme this year is Open Hearts Open Minds. This year’s theme encourages students to open their hearts and their mind to what’s possible and inspire them to dream big.

IMG_0344

This year’s goal is to reach 10 million virtual miles. This event has been organised for the last two years and my classes will be part of it again this year. Despite the busy time of year as it is close to the end of our school year, it is always exciting to open up the classroom to the world and connect with others. The connections can be short or long. Some classes are sleeping over and skyping for 36 hours. There are teachers from many many countries all actively seeking partners to connect with. A good spot to find partners is on:

  • Skype in the Classroom website – Mystery Skype  (use the filter options to find the country/subject/age group of choice)
  • Twitter – using the hashtag #skypeathon in the search bar
  • See the images below

skypeathon poster

Ideas for connecting

  • just say hello, share flags, time, weather etc
  • students share their big dreams with each other
  • share some objects reflecting culture
  • play mystery skype or one of the other mystery type games
  • find an expert to connect with
  • take a virtual tour etc

Resources

Mystery Skype OneNote Book – full of resources for teachers

Twitter #skypeathon Follow @skypeclassroom

Are you going to be part of this wonderful adventure? What countries will you link up with? What do you have planned for the connection?

Do you have any questions, need help or advice or? Please add as a comment as I am one of the Skype Master Teachers and would love to help you.

 

The global collaborator: Discussions on #SDG11 – India/Australia

The United Nations have adopted a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG goals) in a bid to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all.

One of the new ISTE Student Standards is the Global CollaboratorStudents use digital tools to broaden their perspectives and enrich their learning by collaborating with others and working effectively in teams locally and globally.

Sustainable Development Goal no. 11  of the United Nations SDG goals is to  “Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.”

Both these goals were put into practice by communicating and connecting over skype  with Anu Sharma a teacher in New Delhi, India and year 8 her students. Her students were studying SDG goals, in particular the Sustainable Cities aspect. They wanted to discuss problems relating to traffic – pollution etc in our countries. The first connection was a mystery skype ( to work out what country each of us were from).

The second  involved discussions about traffic rules, how they work in each of our cities and the road signs that we use. Anu’s students would do some research work and find possible solutions to the prevalent problems, which would then be discussed in the second skype connection. Her students made display boards, PowerPoint presentations and prepared speeches.

hawkesdale sign

The main road through Hawkesdale

Dirt tracks around Hawkesdale

At first, I was reluctant. Our school is in a town with a population of 220. There is not much traffic and little or no pollution. Some of our roads are dirt, and the majority of vehicles comprise trucks, buses and through traffic. Their city in contrast has a population of more than 21 million, pollution is of high concern and there is high traffic usage.  However, we do have some problems with the health of our roads, slow moving vehicles eg tractors and animals such as kangaroos on the roads and although it is in stark contrast to Delhi could make good learning comparisons.  Australia ranks 20th on SDG index and India ranks 116th.

However, I agreed to connect. As most of my classes are in the morning, this did not match with the Indian times. The ideal connection would have been my year 8 ICT class communicating virtually.  Instead, I asked some students if they would come in at lunchtimes to connect. It was 1pm our time and 8:30am Indian time.

 

The three sessions that we connected were fascinating. My students had to listen intently to the accents of the Indian participants to ensure we could understand their speaking. It was much easier when they shared their screen and showed the powerpoint presentations, with imagery and some text. There were some similarities but many, many differences, some of which shocked us.

Similarities:-

  • many of our road rules were the same.
  • the majority of our road signs were similar
  • each country suffered from major potholes, but ours were caused by trucks, milk tankers, rain, poorly sealed roads, some of theirs were caused by earthquakes.

Differences:

  • sheer population numbers
  • traffic jams of gigantic proportions (their are no traffic jams in our local area)
  • Our traffic is light, theirs was incredibly heavy and busy
  • Pollution was heavy in Delhi, light in Hawkesdale
  • Another gaping difference was the method in which the potholes are repaired. They  showed pictures of 20 – 30 people working on the roads compared with us in Australia, using advance machinery and equipment.

Mystery Skype with Georgia

selfie good one

Skype in the Classroom is an amazing resource. People across the world actively search for educators to connect with. Many of our mystery skype connections come from people’s requests to me! One such request was from Marina Tarughishvili , a teacher in Georgia. See her blog I was very surprised to see that we could connect in real time as Europe is often beyond our school hours. However, 9am their time, was 3pm our time.

pondering the clues

I was little nervous as I only speak English, and Marina said that her English was poor. My students printed off their names to share in introductions to the webcamera. Other signs included “Please repeat”. “thinking” and some of our questions were printed out. A cricket bat, money, toy koala, Australian flag and some sheep’s wool were ready to show if we worked out each other’s countries before our bell went.

Marina, brought the English teacher her with and their spoken English was clear and the accent relatively easy to understand. We flipped a coin to see who asked the first question. Our questions required a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer but they asked good open ended questions of us eg what is part of our native environment, what is one of our native animals, do we have lots of rain, do we have a desert, what oceans are we near? etc. Eventually they worked out our country. Once our students discovered they were from Europe, they asked if their country started with a ‘G’? Students tried Germany, then Greece but as they had their computers switched on, discovered that Georgia was in Europe – a country they had never heard of.

When we showed our flag to them, they were quick to pull out a mobile phone, use search to locate their flag to show us.

It would be good to connect again to find out more about their country. In the meantime, that will be the student’s next task to create a Sway with multnodal information on Georgia.

The highlights:-

  • being able to make ourselves understood
  • seeing shy students starting to voluntarily come up to the webcamera and ask a question or share something
  • hearing one of my most challenging students ask if we could keep on doing this for the rest of the term!
  • seeing how engaged my class was