Category Archives: conferences

EduTECH 2017 Library Congress Report

EduTECH conference – Library Congress, Sydney 2017

conference centre.jpg

EduTECH is the southern hemisphere’s biggest technology conference. In 2017 there were

  • 8760 attendees
  • 253 speakers
  • 200 exhibitors and
  • 8 parallel congresses

It was held in the new Sydney Conference and Convention Centre. I was invited to present for the Library Congress on the topic of Connected Classrooms: Global Classrooms. My presentation can be found on slideshare Connected Classrooms: Global Classrooms Or you can view it below. The online document that was created can be found by clicking here.

welcome to edutech

The 5 Takeaways from chair of Library Congress

  1. Look at how we use our spaces
  2. Challenge our own mindset, change the mindset of our staff
  3. It is ok to fail, you may not have mastered that task just yet.
  4. Collaboration can never be underestimated –
  5. Share the love of the library

Everyone was encouraged to keep the dialogue going after the conference.

the exhibition hall.jpg

As to the actual Library Congress, there were a number of interesting. A summary of those that resonated with me are outlined below.

The first session was “What makes a library great?” with Kim Tairi who spoke of the importance of empathy and user experience. This metaphor is big in NZ in Polynesian practice. Libraries are on a journey, looking at what has gone before and what is the future.

The library at AUT is dynamic, collaborative, noisy, messy, cafes, green screens, studios are all in the one building with the library as part of this space. Many students want quiet learning spaces. They have a level where we can play with design, evaluate and then iterate on a number of levels. Screens to sit down and talk to a service delivery librarian.

Incubator floor has a makerspace – Studio 55 – make, break, hack and make. Peer learning collaboration and is faculty agnostic. Many of uni innovative spaces are within faculties. Artist in residence, programming, framework, community of practice. Give library staff a space to play and learn new skills. Cultural transformation – giving people permission to work differently. People work in co-work spaces, collaborative spaces and prepares our students for the new world of work. Libraries need to reflect society that we are part of.

future library.jpg

To transform need to think about exploring eg indigenous culture – what does it mean to be a multi cultural woman and return to the homeland. Concepts of cultural change – be welcoming, hospitable and get people on board. Develop Empathy, Knowledge and Understanding. There are Issues with new spaces and staff with old mindsets:  It is important to know where you are going, so that you can still understand where you have been. Lyn Hay Designing future-focused school libraries

Online Leading Learning Institute Charles Sturt University

There is a need to rethink the functionality and design of your school library. What should our school library look like? (form). What do you want it to do? (function). How do we communicate what we stand for and what we do (branding) Rethinking school library as an iCentre https:///studentslearn.wordpress.com/about/about-icentres. What are you actually doing to get out there and live on people’s devices.

What is VR and AR?  With Chelsea Wright

VR and AR glasses

They use google card. Apps for VR should be integrated into library – catalogue it, training, procedures for use, storage, maintenance so teachers can access them.

Prepare the library – create user-case scenarios, instructions and promote it. Video See augmented reality in the library- examples of apps being used in our schools AR is good for increased motivation, collaboration, deeper content understandings, useful for teaching abstract topics, face on not side by side on individual computers. However, it can also be distractive technology.

Virtual reality – influences thinking and behavior It will potentially transform childrens’ health, educational and entertainment interactions. Virtual deppelganger – 3rd person controlled by simulation Avatar – first person, controlled by your body movements. Can choose an avatar that is very different to your body. Good apps to try are google earth, VCR Ancient World, HASS Ancient Egypt The Arts

Creating a high tech learning lab in a museum

See Matt Richard’s presentation, read his bio and follow him on twitter

Makey makey, students made an art bot with physical resources and collaboratively made music with garbage instruments

Flying machines programs – Everything students do is in Maori and they are actually creating language as they go. Maori Medium Project Showed a 360 video when looked at on phone, gives a VR experience. Tiltbrush is best VR creation ever.

3D can make worlds in worlds See Sutu eats flies. How can they get their collection into the world to actually get them into scanners so they can play with it and not just look at it. The paperlearning lab on youtube look for Donald  extending object based learning by making it digital. Can house it online at sketchfab?

Hololens – vendor stadium Headset which augments the real – adds the overlay to the real. Choose your own adventure around you. AR is used via gestures. Big headset now, but will soon become smaller glasses.  We have collaborations with schools across country – virtual excursions by beaming in with ghangouts etc See the learning labs and Why this museum lab generation is critical to learning.  Unscripted learning is great – collaboration is the whole theme of today at edutechau.

Jared Cooney Horvath, Co-president, The Science of Learning Group and The Education Neuroscience Initiative

Unless you have a concept for something you cannot see it. A tribe in The Himba do not have the colour blue in their language so interesting to test if they can or cannot see it. We have 27 shades of green and himba have 36. Our concepts our schema our stories drive our perception of the world around us. How can people from other cultures have never used blue, especially when the sky is blue.

The things we take for granted even to the point that the sky is blue is only because we have those concepts. The WHY of mindfulness – knowing all our stories are driving us to recognise stories to recognise what they are doing. It is the way we interact with the world. The more we can understand that we can control our own stories and destinations and change our own stories.

First you must learn the rules so you know how to break them properly. Think outside the box you have to know the box. The suggestion that stories drive our perception of the world is great for librarians.

Librarian panel discussion – books are still popular despite technology and digital media.

Silent room for year 12 studies (or at least the illusion of silence), dedicated zones for being quieter, but the buzz is likeable. Library is only space where students can collaborate as no classrooms are open at lunchtime. Healthy to have downtime, switch off and don’t study all the time.

Maker Movement at Bialikk College Roxanne Ciddor, Head of Educational Resources – library and elearning 3 year old kinder to year 12.

A maker movement can change our concepts of learning. Why in libraries?

A makerspace is a space for creativity, invention and making. It focuses on technology and is a bridge between creators and consumers. Library is where we can mix disciplines. Makerspaces are transliterate and exciting.

Roxanne started with a mixed box of lego purchased on ebay and left them in the waiting room. It was so popular that she then added more equipment and took over a space.  All you need for a makerspace is Blutac, straws and paddle pop sticks.  Not having everything builds resourcefulness. Students need time to play. Then open to coding, coding through a maze, add extra things to it. Until you let them play they will not consider the learning that can be had Use it like a toy, cos it feels like a toy. Took a year for makerspace to get through the play phase – they have played with everything and now have ownership.

Deconstructions: use fax machines, don’t include hammers or mallets (or batteries). Purpose parts and complexities – deconstructed this thing, what does it do, how did it fit in, how can we reconstruct. Remove the batteries and remove the power cords.  Deconstrucion builds that curiousity/methodical approach, playfulness, resourcefulness.

Restrict access to materials – cos kids wanted to just play with that robot. On Monday it will be a maker challenge – eg make a structure out of paddlepops that will hold an app. Tuesdays is coding eg robots, online coding Wednesday is low tech day eg painting, crochet to keep fine motor skills and a knitting pattern is code. Thursday have 3D Thursdays. Students start to plan. Students are getting more exposure to things. Building choice out of a lack of choice. Do keep track – don’t expect school admin to buy in without stats. Get kids to put their pics in the box eg with spheros so know if something is missing who left it out. Breeding responsibility – this is my equipt, what I booked and what I want to use. When students login it starts to give stats to go to admin to get more money. They have mix of age and mix of gender.Do allow students to be teachers, don’t expect them to be adultsStudents are monitors once a term. Give them fluoro vests. Track with dot on their photo. They are giving back, they belong to the community. Agency and responsibility: documentation – get kids to reflect on their learning. Make book = exercise book. Before end of every session, take a photo of what they have been doing and kids write a reflection. Give them starter sentences : eg today I tried this and it did not work. Rolling them over every year.

Reflective and mindfulness: Do make kids cry. Don’t let it be all about the product. Aim is build resilience and persistence to get their best work. Do be organised – lots of tubs and tables.

Final session of conference: Mr Mal Booth – uni librarian at UTS.  University library blog will have presentation.

Questions may be more important than answers. Netflix gives you instant access no longer in real time. What is a book these days? Really only journals or books online. Could learn more from gaming technology. They are a publisher as well – interactive text. Cecilia hefier is a textile artist.

Using multimedia with monographing.  Don’t wait until journal is finished, publish as you go. No longer a container that is published when it is full. Advocacy – help to explain what is open access, led by modelling. Cultural and artistic stimulation – Change.org; github is social coding reddit is questioning  Chris Gaul is an artist doing innovative things for libraries etc

Underground library – Elisa Lee and Adam Hinshaw Air 2014 Video of digital rendering of what underground books like.

Program Manifest 20th century. Live data feed. Zoe Sadokierski explored the nature of the book. Print and digital technology is actually assisting each other. Digital literacy kits – small low technology to prove that digital literacy is part of our world. Introduce students to technologies beyond snapchat and facebook.

closing ceremony

Closing session: Phillip Heath Barker college Darking Bridging the Education Gap

How can we reconcile all people as an Australian nation? Aboriginals were a mysterious group – depicted in the media but never seen.

Why Darkinjung Barker

  • To provide opportunities
  • Celebrate cultural identity
  • To provide support to ensure no-one slips through educational gaps
  • To offer choice
  • To enable a practical, two way reconciliation

They created a school by taking the city school to the place of the aboriginal students. Started a little school to provide choice and identity and bring aboriginal identity into an existing school. It is a partnership between an indigenous land council and one of the most prestigious private schools – Barker College. Started with 28 students just for indigenous children in the area. 1 teacher to 7 students.  It is sponsored by private corporations. One of the children and his mum lived in a car. Yet they deserve best opportunity that we can provide. Still find it hard to find answers. Have a large and growing indigenous population along the coast. The focus is on celebration of every child’s achievement with feedback about how they are going. Some kids were 2 to 4 years behind.

When you have never met an aboriginal person, you never get to care or see the real human stories. Education is part of the key to unlock the future.   Create a school on country – where first language is the school language. Do we dare to let go of the power and authority on the way we run schools and celebrate cultural identity first. Now creating a second school.

young people today.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

               

 

Connected Classrooms: Global Classrooms

This was the theme for my presentation at the EduTECH conference in Sydney on Friday June 10th. It was a presentation given as part of the Library Congress. An online document was given to share resources and links. Following is my presentation, with a focus on stories for libraries.

When English is not a common language!

books on languages

This was topic that I put up for round table discussion at the recent Global Education Day, which was part of the ISTE 2016 conference. The full agenda for the Global Education Day can be found here.

As technology enables teachers/students/classes/community members to become increasingly globally connected, it cannot be expected that all connecting parties will speak English or a share a common language. This leads to different demands in communication and collaborative skills.

This session will encourage participants to discuss, share, interact and take a look at some of the apps, tools and physical ways of ensuring that communication and collaboration can still take place. Looking at challenges and enablers.

Although most participants were interested in working with their own mixed culture/language classroom, the same principles apply with virtually connected students.

Questions to be considered:

  • Why is it important to work around students who are connected but do not speak a common lanugage?
  • Other means of communicating?
  • Where do we find people who do not speak English?
  • Resources available
  • What tools can we use – synchronous and asynchronous to overcome the language barriers?
  • What would/could you put into your grab bag of objects to share local culture?
  • Further tips and hints on being prepared.

Participants at the Global Education Day round table included representatives from 

  • Edutopia
  • The Wonderment – creativity is the common thread
  • 1to1 Learning

A number of individual educators

Students with neurology problems – communication is important for these.

 

Suggested Apps used for teaching and learning for students who are bilingual within your classroom

Lingro – brand new students who have no English – converts into their own language. How to mediate meaning

Need to be very explicit in connecting visual materials with language.  Tech helps bringing to life eg little farmers, toca nature, age dependent – kinder: framework for basics of how things work in world, little builders etc Break it all down visually in explicit steps.  PBS kids, visuals show timelines, visuals extentuate.

Skype – direct audio translation Tried European languages, Latin America

Figures of speech can cause problems

 

Autistic kids – stories to tell, bring in the photos, audio. Social stories. Where do I live? Made it personal – pics of sons room, house etc to make personal connections. Could make it cross cultural.

Edmodo, facebook, twitter, google have translation options.

Make videos that are very visual so that anyone of any language can understand that. Takes away from the spoken language. Kids around world, kids create what they like. Biggest problems is to make connections. Language is a form of communication but not the only one. Kids creativity is universal. They all have ideas. Art based, pictures based, what do you hear?

Common Challenges and Strategies – how to group students

What is the common challenge for teaching students of mixed languages:

Often the baggage that comes to classroom, how to create a culture that helps them handle their “baggage” (ie the problems they bring with them from previous experiences).. Students come from war torn countries, some dont have electricity, some are here illegally. What stops them completing their homework etc and how can we overcome that.

Brian’s connections are with refugees, how to preserve culture, figures of speech, how to understand different types of humour, sarcasm – didn’t translate on any and every level. Cultural barriers. Global Education projects – use a variety of technologies that can be tailored to student needs.

System challenge is assessment – regardless of advancement of students, they never get to the top.

Assisted technology is a huge barrier – the classroom cannot be carried over into the community – digital inequity. Disagreement – Columbia has private school – all resources, cf with another school that only has books both achieve well on the standardized tests.Gifted kids from other cultures/languages- how do you meet them. Can’t even assess what they really know.

Multi lingual team in some districts – if one school has more than 20 non-English speaking students, then get language experts to come in for 1 hour per week. Google translate is used – gets ideas across, although translation is not yet fully functional. Get students onto one platform so they can communicate – translation problems, get teachers to be able to access the site.

China cannot access the sites. Google translate does not translate all the alphabets. Trying to meet stakeholders wherever they are. Parent/teacher interviews: greet parents in their language first, then communicate using lots of pictures etc.

 

Difference  between real time mediating and non real time.

When starting with students at personal level, educators can give support at different levels. Classroom of 60 students, the more you give to enable students to make decisions, the less you have to provide support. Eg crying may indicate being hungry, pain, outside comfort zone etc when kids need you.  Get others to collaborate with those who are good at certain subjects.  Collaboration is key to synchronous learning.

Learning one to one foundation Erika Twani CEO Community and parents want the kids to attain a certain grade but kids new to country it is ok if you try it again. Unlimited ‘redos’. Collaborate collaborate collaborate

The first story that kids will read in class is Romeo and Juliet – come up with ways of teaching it that does not talk about Shakespeare.

 

Second session –

Apps – google translate – audio conversion. Google translate app on the ipad or android devices- even translates signs overseas – images, audio and text

 

An idea for collaboration beyond languages

Bi-lingual setting – English and Spanish will look at pattern of shadows – different shadows in different latitudes.

Gnomon Project –thegnomonproject.com

Look at what the shadow does every day for a long time, it will alter. How will it look if other side of equator, north of equator.

Dept of Defence Schools cos they speak English

 

Collect height of the shadow, length direction, Record as a percentage – 50% is a common language-

Winter vs summer, different hemispheres etc

 

 

Teaching, learning and “Presenting on the fly!”

Shannon from Taiwan

My presentation at #EdutechAU ran for 1 hour and 15 mins and was to be a combination of a presentation, interactive learning and some hands-on. I allowed 30-45mins for the interactivity. Some participants used the backchannel to ask questions, which I duly answered. When I asked for suggestions as to what people would like to learn or see demonstrated, I was surprise to hear one attendee ask me to demonstrate skype.

Rather taken aback as I assumed that nearly everyone knew what it was like, I had to think on the fly! I showed them my HLW Skypers group where people are usually about 24/7 but as it was 1:30pm most of the US, Europe and Africa would be asleep, leaving possibilities of Asian colleagues who were probably teaching. I put in a quick plea for help

my plea for help

In my haste I wasn’t very clear with the message, told the audience they may have to wait a while and we went on to play kahoot. Within 10 minutes, Shannon Huang from Taiwan responded. A real connection was made, the bandwidth was perfect and many of the advanced features of skype demonstrated. Shannon talked about her students’ work which we could see just behind her. Then I asked a favour to see whether we could trial the skype language translator. We had to hang up, I set the translator on, rang back and much to our amusement watched it try and interpret our conversation.

What an amazing and perfect demonstration, on the fly, in real time to show how well we can engage with Asia. Thanks a heap, Shannon!

 

 

The World is My Classroom

Over 2 days I am fortunate to be able to both attend and present at the Edutech conference in Brisbane.

IMG_8150

The World is My Classroom is the name of my presentation.  It will be part presentation, part hands on but as interactive as possible.

My presentation –

Here are the links set up for the interactivity:-

  1. The Backchannel
  2. The Online Document of Resources
  3. The presentation (to be uploaded)

Hands On activities –

  1. Padlet “What did you have for breakfast?” Add a picture, text or video or ????
  2. Online collaboration document – Let’s Play
  3. Titan Pad – Favourites –  Etherpad 1    Etherpad 2     Etherpad 3    Etherpad 4    Etherpad 5    Etherpad 6    Etherpad 7    Etherpad 8    Etherpad 9     Etherpad 10
  4. Kahoot – link for students

Reinventing Learning – Microsoft Conference

brisbane

Over the years that I have been teaching technology, I have always enjoyed using MS Office in my computer classes and although I have an iPhone and iPad, still use a windows based laptop and personal computer. Last year, I applied to become a Microsoft Innovative Expert Educator and was accepted into the program. As part of this profile, I was invited to attend the “Redefine Learning” conference in Brisbane, several weeks ago. Below is a summary of some of my experiences and learning at the conference.

redefine learning

Redefining Learning Conference

This conference organised by Microsoft was primarily for Microsoft Innovative Expert Educators and Microsoft Showcase Schools using the hashtag  #redefinelearn on twitter.

Some of the standout learnings and quotes were:-

  1. Change can start with a conversation. A group can make that change happen. The emphasis was creating a network of innovative and passionate educators.
  2. If you want to make change look for someone who is doing it, copy/mashup/remix what they are doing.

Highlights

  1. Developing a strong professional learning network with people who have similar passions and interests.
  2. Being exposed to some of the latest thinking in learning
  3. Having some exciting collaborative and interactive tools being released through MicroSoft including OneNote and Swayy
  4. Hands on learning experience in maker spaces with students – robotics, coding etc

A brief run down on some of the experiences and presentations

St Stephens School visit

The conference started with a school visit from a choice of two schools and this was one of the highlights of the conference for me. The principal of St Stephens showed us around. He emphasised that we are in a creative era – therefore learning spaces have become a personal passion his as they  enable collaborative, interactive and blended learning. The use of technology and its affordability and what can be done is only limited by our imagination.

Open spaces, moveable furniture and tables of many different styles, glass walls etc feature everywhere and allow blended, collaborative and interactive learning. Regular PD has been provided for staff and learning spaces have evolved and been adapted for blended learning. Staff have seen the pedagogy needs and used flexible spaces to do this.

They use a young innovative architect. Building towards successful organisation wide blended learning as they are finding traditional classrooms no longer work. The pen or stylus is now being embraced with the surface pros by increasing numbers of teachers. Windows devices are the preferred device due to pen etc and common platforms etc. They commenced with a goal of achieving blended learning, then built the courses and added in content. 3 years later, staff build the course without realising they were moving to a blended learning environment. Majority of teaching is online, but artwork is done in a traditional classroom. Tutorials online teach staff and students how to use OneNote etc. Analytics show that students are logging on in great numbers on the weekends to make use of the online learning environment. As blended learning involves technology enhanced learning, devices are fully supported by 3 technicians (a vital factor for success).

Conference Sessions

Mark Sparvell, Worldwide Showcase School Program Lead, Microsoft

Innovative schools are focussed on happiness, citizenship, adaptive capabilities, active and involved citizenship but problems around managing change.

Transformation occurs one conversation at a time. Takes a community to make the transformation.

Edupreneur: Unleashing teacher led innovation in schools David Faulkner, Education Change Makers  David encouraged us to share what “what is unacceptable……” for young ones today, but to then turn it into what we can do about it. He encouraged us to put together radical ideas – radical collaboration – copying from each other, collaborating together and creating a new direction in learning. There is a need to teach people how to innovate. Come up with 100 solutions to the problem. The first idea is often the worst. One idea in first 60 might be okay. Between 80 and 100 of those ideas come 5-7 real ideas for client. Some of the most ridiculous ideas build the best innovation and products.

Deanne Joosten, a teacher from Phoenix P12 School  “Beyond 4 Walls”.

Consider the screen as a portal, not a window and innovate learning beyond the classroom. Very few people are crazy enough to teach drama or many practical classes via videoconferencing. In one year she taught 3 remote classes together with her face to face class. This involved 614kms 7.5 hours of driving. Teaching and learning through a screen makes you think of working in other ways – broadens the mind. Teachers have to work hard to make them feel like they are being there with us and students need to think outside the box. Deanne used a live skype linkup with one of her drama classes to demonstrate how it can be done.

deanne and students

Friday morning started with a series of Teachmeet style 5 minute presentations. These included:-


Teachmeet

8 Mini presentations – 5 minutes each

Pip Cleaves Bringing it all together with Docs.com
Annette McArthur STEM Project based learning initiatives in our makerspace
Steve Crapnell Visible Thinking via SNIP and OneNote
Travis Goulter Positive Behaviour in the 21st Century with Red Critter
Anne Mirtschin The Magic of Mystery Skype
Sheree Bennett Enhancing understanding through feedback, collaboration and a tiny robot
Ineke McGuire Using OneNote to enhance differentiation and personalisation in the classroom
Nathan Moore Yammer for Social Learning
   

Participants were then give 2 x 15 mins to interact further with 2 of these presenters in round table style discussions.

Megan Towns – The MS Educator Community

This session was aimed at helping us to get connected and stay engaged with others around the world. Profiles allow the sharing of personality, achievements, passions, interests and what you are doing.

Megan introduced many of the social media tools that we can use for networking.

Introducing Microsoft Classroom: A new experience in Office 365 with Ari Schorr, Produc Mardeting Manager, Microsoft.

Using MS Classroom and some of its finer features for collaborative learning, ease of assessment and

feedback to students etc

Stem Hackathon

ebots.jpg

Students from Ormiston College, years 5 to 12, (and teachers) led us in a hands on STEM experience.

The session showed ways that students are integrating STEM into their learning at all year levels and across the curriculum at Ormiston College. We looked at some of their robotics, robots, coding the robots and using a number of software tools to code. An enjoyable and engaging session and one of the conference highlights.

student as mentors

The conference closed with a Microsoft Closing Keynote speaker and final words from Travis Smith encouraging us to redefine learning, continue to network and push teaching into new directions.

 

 

Skype in the Classroom

This was a topic for a 30 minute presentation that I made to Sheldon College, in Brisbane, Queensland, 1883 kms from me.

The presentation was made using skype and covered how to use skype, find contacts, advanced features and sample classroom uses including virtual guest speakers/experts, global connections, cultural experiences, virtual tours etc . Here is what was done:

  1. intitial contact made using emails
  2. test of skype connection earlier in the day between the school and me
  3. a quick run through of the proposed session with Vanessa the co-ordinator of the Professional Development Day to ensure it met their objectives and needs
  4. a back channel set up in todays meet for participants to introduce themselves (and for me to have some idea about the interests and needs of the audience)
  5. Chat messages to alert me to when they were ready for the presentation.
  6. Cabled my laptop in for best bandwidth
  7. Videoconference call made at the appointed time for the session
  8. Webcamera introduction
  9. Screen share from my end allowed me to share the powerpoint presentation with the remote location.

See the presentation:-

https://docs.com/d/embed/D25193928-4011-7935-3820-000397619509%7eM9dcb2cf0-75c2-fd54-cc0d-4cb4b9b90919

This took approximately 30 mins. Sound, video and audio were all good. The presentation was uploaded into docs.com for sharing and the link emailed through.