Monthly Archives: December 2019

The Global Education Conference 2019 Reflections

This is such a wonderful conference – it is free, online and global. It goes 24 hours a day over 3 days. Again I had the pleasure of being able to moderate the conference with Sue Wyatt from Tasmania for the times that the US educators are asleep. It is fun and quite a learning curve taking on this role as we tend to have the times that are friendly to countries that may not speak English as a first language. This brings in a lot of challenges including misunderstandings,  second languages, accents, uncertainty of procedures, attendees with names that are hard even attempt to pronounce etc.

As I waited to help Vietnamese teachers provide their presentation, I was fascinated to hear them all talking to each other in Vietnamese from each of their geographical locations. It is interesting to hear people speaking their local languages, as too often we expect them to have a go at English so that we understand. Sometimes it was necessary to moderate more than one session at once, and be in 4 or 5 rooms helping to set up and ensure all was going smoothly with the online sessions. Fortunately, my laptop held up to the demands. However, on the second night of the conference, (Australian time) the NBN (our our open access data project) was taken down for maintenance and I was unable to moderate any sessions. A big thank you to Sue Wyatt for taking on the full responsibility. When you have spare time, please look through the list of sessions that were provided and listen to the recordings. There are some amazing conversations, experiences and presentations.

Join the Global Education Conference community to view the following resources: . Recordings are available by clicking on this link. 

If you attended sessions and were a registered attendee, request an attendee certificate here – one per attendee

Global education resources are available by clicking on this link

 

The Hour of Code

This week encourages an Hour of Code which is an annual event students are happy to join in, especially when they know that others across the world are participating.

There are always engaging challenges posted online for students to try. When they complete the challenge, a certificate is provided. Students right click on the certificate and save it in their folder. Students then add the image to a post on their blog.

The following links were given and students could choose which one they would like to try. Some completed two or more of the activities within the hour.

  1. Studio Code
  2. Hour of Code Activities or
  3. Studio code 2019 

Follow the conversations on Twitter #HourofCode @codeorg

A panellist on the Shymkemt, Kazakhastan Flash Mob Jury

Over the last three years, I have been priveleged to be a jury member (judge) for the Shymkemt Flash Mob Jury. This is an amazing collaborative event held at a school in the  Republic of Kazakhstan to celebrate the UN International Day for Tolerance in November. Students at this school in Shymkemt perform a dance as part of a group of 10 or more students to their choice of music which can often mash and incorporate music from different genres including traditional folk.

Organisation on a global scale – largely led by Begaim, one of the teachers. Each year it improves and allows for many of the judges who speak English as their first or second language.

  • a call for jury members (or judges) is sent out world wide through a variety of Skype group lists.
  • a link is provided to a google sheet for educators/classes to add their names as jury members.
  • A Skype group is formed as a backchannel prior to, during and after the event.
  • The Flash Mob is live streamed through Youtube, with a test connection prior to the event.
  • Prior to the official event, a professional and highly engaging video showing Shymkemt is played through the youtube channel.
  • As the event starts two student leaders welcome everyone and announce the global judges which are a mix of teachers and classes from countries across the world – Germany, Bangladesh, Russia, Vietnam, Australia, USA, Sth Korea, Kasakhstan,  Taiwan, Hungary etc
  • Thirteen groups performed. Each of them was judged on a number of criteria and given a score from 5 to 10. They were judged on dance energy, team spirit, musicality, dance synchrony, creativity, appearance. Scores were added to the collaborative google sheet after each performance.
  • Students chose their own music and made up their own moves. All were of a high standard and scores were close
  • A master sheet kept track of the totals
  • After approximately 1.5 hours, the final scores and winners were announced

See the video

Reflections

  • it is very special to be a virtual judge of events like this
  • live participants in the youtube channel came from a variety of countries so their comments came up in their native language – fascinating to watch and to try and translate!
    languages in global judging
  • the youtube channel showed the name of the group who was currently performing so we were all judging the right group
  • however, as a collaborative sheet was worked on, someone was entering their scores on my sheet which threw me out as I looked like I was judging the dance group that had not yet started and not the current one.