Author Archives: annemirtschin

Bridging cultural differences

Toni Oliveri-Barton and Lisa Parisi at globaled summit

Toni Oliveri-Barton and Lisa Parisi at globaled summit

This afternoon I will be attending the Global Education summit and leading a round table discussion on Bridging Cultural Differences. Here is the link to the crowdsourced document or http://bit.ly/1lAnYxT Please add  your ideas and resources here

When the North Star meets the Southern Cross!

Wisteria, our engaging presenter

Wisteria, our engaging presenter

This morning reminded me how anxious and nervous teachers can get when they face the unknown! Although I have used our polycom videoconferencing equipment extensively with educators, classes and community organisations within Australia, I had never dialled an overseas polycom unit. The IP address had been given to us to dial rather than they dial us! Eek! A practice run was rather difficult due to our time zone differences so at 9am my time this morning, I dialled the number 15 mins before the students were due in for lesson one, having shared Skype contact details should we face technical problems.

Almost immediately, Wisteria answered the call and we were transported into Marriner’s Museum, Virginia, USA, a different day, a different time zone, different hemsipherse, different culture, history and a different accent.  Students from year 1/2, year 7 and 9 then enjoyed an engaging and interactive session with Wisteria as she revealed life at sea centuries ago. It was fascinating to hear from someone in our ‘yesterday’, who talked about the Northern Star and their famous explorers eg Christopher Columbus cf Captain Cook for us.

wisteria and boatsc

What worked well

  • a crystal clear videoconference on both sides, with no hint of lag
  • our microphone that was able to pick up the answers from our students who often spoke quietly and were at the back of the room.
  • an engaging and interactive presenter, in Wisteria, who varied the session with a mix of using images, objects from the museum, getting the students involved, using the webcam effectively  and even sharing a youtube video that did not lag either!
  • having the broad mix of age groups. The young students added a dynamic, unreserved and spontaneous addition

some of the students

At the end of the 60 minute session, students were asked to relate three things they learned and one thing they enjoyed. Following are some of the year 7 ICT student comments. Year 1/2 repsonses will be added as soon as they have had their responses go through the editing stage.  By the time year 7 related what they learnt and due to most remembering different elements of the presentation, their total compilation almost gives the overall presentation on Life at Sea.

wisteria and the little ones

3 things I learnt:

  • When at sea,  they worked for 4 hours and rested 4 hours,  about the different parts of ship

  • What people at sea eat, lots about compasses, learnt all about parts of ship

  • The youngest pirate executed was 9 years old. Captain Cook was first captain to give his crew fresh vegetables, in their spare time, crew members would carve pics on whale teeth

  • Only males were allowed to go on a ship, and as young as 6 or 7; they would eat crackers made of flour and water, dominoes were made from parts of whale’s mouth

  • Children started work at age of 6 and 7 – eg scrub the deck, peel the vegies; because they didn’t eat fresh veg and fruit, they lost their teeth and their skin would change colour; older kids would have to work for hours, $12 per month pay

  • Pirates take valuable things, you need vitamin C otherwise you get black gums and your teeth will fall out; little boys started work on ships between the age of 6 and 7

  • Kids went on ships at such young ages; women work on ships disguised as boys; pirates don’t really kill captives unless they have to – put them on an island if they did not comply. Walking the plank was only done once in history. It is not a common practise.

  • It was night in USA, 7pm, our today was there yesterday; pirates don’t make you walk a plank, only one person was ever made to do that; Time differences, didn’t know USA were so far away from us,

Showing museum objects

Showing museum objects

What I liked

  • Much better learning from someone like Wisteria than through a textbook
  • How she showed the actual objects
  • Hearing about the female pirates
  • All of it was really good – Wysteria was a really good presenter, asked questions and got everyone involved.
  • Different time and it was interesting to know that she was in my yesterday and there was a night time concert outside while she spoke to us.
  • Lady pirate Chin commanded 500 pirate ships, made me interested in old history
  • The problem with hearing clearly eg the girl was actually a boy who answered a question, misunderstanding accents
  • Liked how she was actually at the museum, and showed us the actual objects from the ship
  • To see the things they used – photos and objects

watches

If I could ask a question

  • why did kids start work so young
  • Did they eat canned food?

  • What kind of food do they have in America?

Question time

Question time

 

Coding for Everyone – a Tech Talk Tuesday presentation

Marc Grossman of the UK recently presented on Programming for Everyone in a recent Tech Talk Tuesday webinar. As part of this session, Marc shared some of the following tools and online software:-

  1. Code Crunch from Education City aimed at young children
  2. Scratch from MIT  aimed at children 8+ Scratch Jnr is about to be released
  3. Kodu from Microsoft Research is used to design games in a 3D world. Some great tutorials can be found on Nicky Cooper’s Game Creation in Kodu site and Queen of Kodu  youtube video tutorials
  4. TouchDevelop also from Microsoft Research is used to write programs that work on tablets, smart phones and web browsers.
  5. Code World Club and Code Club World Australia!

Marc stepped Peggy George of the USA through the first task or project in Code Club World Australia demonstrating some of the basic essentials of coding in Scratch. This also proved an interesting challenge in accents and pronunciations especially the words “hall” and “caught”.

Marc also shared the Computing at School website. Thanks Marc for another wonderful presentation. Here is the link to the recording

The accent and not the language barrier!

I was a amused today to hear dynamic Sheryl NussbaumBeach https://twitter.com/snbeach relate a story from years ago of getting up at 2am in the USA to be involved in an online conference. At one stage she grabbed the microphone to share her experiences only to be asked to please repeat what she said. After the third ‘please repeat’ she asked what language they spoke. When English was the reply, she realised her accent was providing a barrier to understanding.

This reminded me of the time I hosted a Tech Talk Tuesday webinar during global education week. I noticed in the chat that someone asked me to slow down. So, politely, I asked what first language they spoke and the response was “English.” My Aussie accent was too broad and fast for them despite me thinking that I was speaking slowly and clearly. Earlier this week I spoke to year 2 students in Russia. Their teacher stated that their questions would be very simple and may be unusual. When asked “Do I have a bed?” I said yes and tried to describe it, only to be interrupted by the teacher to say that the question was “Do I have a pet?” Oh dear!

On Tech Talk Tuesday this week, Marc Grossman from the UK presented on “Coding for everyone”. He stepped Peggy George from USA through creating a simple type game in Scratch. I quietly laughed as the two completely different accents wanted reassuring of what was said eg Did you say ‘hall’? etc  When classes connect and try to communicate, we know that something is not quite right when we hear laughter at the other end when nothing really humorous was related! But, we continue to try and make ourselves understood and just laugh together.

Overcoming the accents!

  • Use a backchannel for questions and to support understanding eg skype chat with video, chat in the virtual classrooms, todays meet etc
  • Slow deliberate talking helps!
  • Laugh together and work through it all as much as possible.

It is interesting to note that skype is working on a translator during video calls. See http://mashable.com/2014/05/27/satya-nadella-microsoft-2/

Overcoming the Loneliness of the Far Distant School!

Visiting Federal Politicians

Visiting Federal Politicians

A big thank you is extended to the education staff at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) who taught our year 9/10 Visual Communication students and VCE Vis Com/Studio Arts students about “the use of lines and patterns in design” – their current topic of study”.

Ingrid Wood of NGV taught them about contemporary Melbourne artists and the ways in which they have used line and pattern in their work. These Melbourne artists were featured in the recent popular Melbourne Now exhibition were featured. Polycom videoconferencing equipment was used to bring Ingrid into our classrooms. Our visiting politicians were also able to witness this great use of technology in giving equal educational opportunities to country students.

Our school is approx 3.5 -4 hours drive to Melbourne. The cost, effort and time taken for a day trip makes it very difficult take students on excursions,  to explore and enjoy many of the cultural institutions that city students take for granted. Our students are geographically and culturally isolated, so it is wonderful to be able to use technology to connect them to many institutions, galleries, museums virtually so that they learn beyond classroom walls.

Feedback from the students on this engaging videoconference:-

  • There are many different simple ways to make art – magazine cutouts of bottles were re-arranged to make a new work of art
  • I liked how they demonstrated local artists from Melbourne to show you can actually do it. They weren’t overseas artists but our very own.
  • I liked the masking tape on  the wall that had an intricate design.
  • Exposure to different artists that we did not know about or haven’t seen before. As a student I wouldn’t know who to look up to find what we saw yesterday.
  • I learnt how to use patterns and colours
  • You can use anything to create art.
  • How different artists use different products that are just part of everyday life to make art – the orange bags, the stickers, the Ikea buckets to make the dome.
  • Really liked the mix of media types eg video, presentation, talk  in the presentation.

How we could improve:-

  • I want to see more even more examples of artists work and more sessions.
  • Position the class better – tables were in the way.
  • Set up a backchannel for questions, feedback as it is too hard to ask question  because students  didn’t want to interrupt the presentation as it stops the flow.
Classroom setup

Classroom setup

 

“Let’s Stop Bullying” – the student voice!

Earlier on this year it was National Action Day against Bullying and Violence

In ICT, Year 7 students were to watch a couple of pertinent videos and discuss bullying. However, based on past experience, only a few students will speak up and the majority will usually remain silent. It was decided to book a virtual classroom in blackboard collaborate where each student could (and did) use the backchannel and the whiteboard to share their experiences, feelings and question. The following questions were posed:

  • What is bullying?
  • What does bullying look like?
  • Where does bullying occur?
  • How does bullying feel?
  • Do you feel safe at school?
  • How can we make school safe?
  • What can you do if you are being bullied
What does a bully look like?

What does a bully look like?

Where does bullying occur?

Where does bullying occur?

How does bullying feel?

How does bullying feel?

At the conclusion of the virtual discussion, the girls approached me and wanted to create a video on “Bullying is not good”. Within a short period of time, the girls, using the discussion pointers and outcomes, put together a movie using MS MovieMaker. This video was later shared the year 9/10 girls health class.

A month or so later, I was alerted to a tweet by Gail Desler, an early online colleague of mine.

Gail Desler and Natalie Bernasconi co-curate the Digi-ID challenge. It was decided to participate in this opportunity and the deadline was extended for a few days so we could be involved. The year 7 girls modified their movie so their faces were no longer showing. Students in Girls Health subject were also encouraged to contribute to this Digi Citizenship project in a short, tight time frame. Below are the final results – 2 interesting videos against bullying, from student perspectives.

Why this worked well?

  • giving every student a voice in a backchannel and on an interactive whiteboard
  • having an authentic project to get involved in.

A great “Open Night”

sebastian and origami

Although we are not even halfway through our school year, schools in our area are holding Open nights and Information Evenings in an effort to ‘sell’ their school to parents and encourage students to come to their school to complete their secondary schooling.

As such our open night was held tonight. After a few brief formal presentations, the visitors are split into two groups, guided around the school and undertake a number of activities. The science lab is converted into a whizbang mix of experiments where amazing light shows and loud ‘bangs’ can be heard, the home economics centre hosts the decoration of cupcakes into a wonderfully cute little pig and students make simple sanded wooden products in the Wood Technology room. I was asked to do something in the computer lab and as such wanted to show the power of technology to engage and connect us beyond classroom walls.

So, I turned to my wonderful colleague in Kerala, India, Sebastian Panakal and asked whether he would have the time to speak to two different groups of parents and students. Instead of just talking to each other, it was decided to put family groups in front of a computer with a map of the world and play Mystery Skype. They came to the webcam and asked questions of Sebastian that could only have a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer. Both parents and students particpated in the questioning and finally worked out he was from India.

Then Sebastian shared the fabulous origami that his wife Seena has made. She learnt the skills through youtube and they are now teaching women in their area this craft so that they can market the product online and make precious and much needed funds from their sale. This was a ‘wow’ session when the intricately made products eg swan, peacock etc were shown. The gasps of delight could be heard! Thanks you Sebastian and Seena for giving up your precious time.

Whilst waiting for the second group to arrive, Sebastian made this little youtube clip and shared it via a link in the skype message. It shows the same wonderful origami. It is now shared on our school facebook page for all the school community to see.

The highlights:

  • families working together on a computer to solve the mystery location
  • plucking up courage to come up to the webcam and ask the question
  • trying to fathom each other’s accents
  • hearing Sebastian talk to his wife in their local dialect when she did not quite understand the Aussie twang
  • seeing the intricate creations that can be called origami and inspiring us to consider going beyond the simple paper folding
  • being able to ask questions of each other
  • but best of all, showing how a small country school that is rurally and culturally isolated can learn beyond classroom walls and the textbook.

The Amazing eClassroom

Reinventing the Classroom is an online, free conference which starts tomorrow (my time) and continues over the next few days. I am proud to be a keynote presenter on the topic: “The Amazing eClassroom”.  Please join me by clicking on this link just prior to 10am (gmt+10), Melbourne Australia time. See timeanddate for your time and day.

There is a wonderful lineup of presenters and keynotes over the next two days, so please check out the schedule link on the right hand side of Reinventing the Classroom, choose your time zone and you can select sessions you wish to join. Let’s all join together and Reinvent the Classroom as creative and innovative use of technology has the power to do so.

Will you be attending? Would love to see you there.  Here is the link to a document that contains the resources for this presentation and the code below will also take you there.

qr code for presentation

 

You can watch this presentation on youtube Amazing eClassrooms

ANZAC Day Activities at School

Students make poppies

Students make poppies

Anzac Day is a special day on the calendar for Australian and New Zealand residents. It is commemorated with a public holiday on April 25th when we remember all those Australians and New Zealanders who have served their countries in wartime.

Our school participated in a number of activities to celebrate and commemorate this day. It has been a time for learning in history and humanities, art and cooking classes.

Our annual school Anzac Day service was held on the 24th April,  with all students and staff, together with some community members in attendance.

Our program went as follows:-

  1.  Welcome and Introduction by our Assistant Principal, Mr Ralph
  2. ANZAC Requiem (In memory of the Fallen): by Sarah, one of our student leaders
  3. P-6 students, then 7-12 STUDENTS – Laying of flowers – symbolic of the beauty that exists in the world around us, and of respect to those who are no longer able to enjoy that beauty
  4. Caitlyn (a student leader) read The Ode (a traditional element of every ANZAC Day and Remembrance Day ceremony)
  5. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
    Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
    At the going down of the sun and in the morning
    We will remember them.
  6. Playing of the Last Post
  7. One minute of silence
  8. Reveille 
  9. Belinda (a student leader)  read ‘In Flanders Fields’ (poetry which is another traditional element of every ANZAC Day and Remembrance Day ceremony)
  10. The National Anthem
  11. Waltzing Matilda
Flowers lay on our Australian flag

Flowers lay on our Australian flag

A special Dawn Service takes place in Hawkesdale at 6:00am on April 25th. The flowers are taken to the Reflection Space for this ceremony and students from our school will be in attendance and actively participating.

The Hawkesdale Dawn Service

The Hawkesdale Dawn Service

Further activities:-
Students in a number of classes baked Anzac Biscuits.  The wonderful aroma wafted through the corridors and they tasted even better than they smelt (or looked). See one of the popular recipes 

Popular Anzac biscuits

Popular Anzac biscuits

Does your school commemorate such events?  If so how? If from another country, do you have special days like this to remember those who fought for your country?

A Fun Easter Hat Parade

collage

The Theme: An Easter Hat Parade

The Models: Grade 5 students from near Boneo, Rosebud, Victoria.These students shared their wonderful Easter Hat creations in a virtual parade.

The audience: Year 7 students from Hawkesdale P12 College, a visiting teacher who is interested in seeing how the virtual classroom works

The tool used: Blackboard Collaborate (BbC)- virtual classroom software provided by our Department of Education for use by Victorian teachers

The outcome – an engaging and fascinating linkup between students of different age groups all learning from each other using the video conference through BbC.

Other Activities: Further activities included all students drawing decorated Easter eggs on the whiteboard, sharing what they were doing over the autumn holidays (this started to show the difference in nature of our geographical locations) and then a discussion with our visiting teacher, who teaches Japanese, as to any pre-existing knowledge about Japan.

Result of 30 students sharing a whiteboard to draw Easter Eggs

Result of 30 students sharing a whiteboard to draw Easter Eggs

What Worked Well

  • taking the plunge with a teacher who is a close colleague (Sally Walsh and I are both web conference coaches) and as such we have complete faith and confidence in each other.
  • an engaging activity – the Easter Hats. All students like to see parades!
  • the nature of the activity – it was a theme on Easter, a popular celebration and displayed lots of creativity. Our school does not do the Easter Hat parades but maybe this will inspire us to do so next year.
  • the chat – students could interact with each other in the chat, ask questions and give feedback on some of the wonderful creations.

The challenges:

  • testing that audio and video works immediately. When classes are involved, it takes time to ensure everyone can logon.
  • Switching off the audio when a class is watching. The loudest noise activates the web camera and projects that classroom.
  • Learning new communication techniques including clear, deliberate, diction, appropriate use of the web camera.
  • Having a visiting teacher in our room

Have you been involved in virtual parades with other schools? How did it go? Would you recommend these types of activities to others?